What If My Disc Golf Disc Lands On Top Of This Basket

What If My Disc Golf Disc Lands On Top Of This Basket?

Disc golf is a sport that requires skill and precision. Disc golfers target the basket as a goal when they throw their discs. However, what if my disc lands on top of your basket? The answer is that you will miss the score.

This post will explain it comprehensively, look into what you should do if the disc ends up on top of your basket, and give tips to help you out of the situation.

We will also give you other situations when playing disc golf so that you can broaden your knowledge about this game.

So, let’s stay tuned with the reading for more details!

What If Your Disc Golf Disc Lands On Top of Your Basket?

As we know, if the disc lands on top of your basket, it will not count as completing the hole or “holing out” when playing disc golf.

In disc golf, this predicament is a “Disc Resting in Top” or a “DROT.” It occurs more frequently than you may think.

In this scenario, the player would need to throw again from the basket’s location with their next shot to continue the game. 

So, their performance on the prior try will not affect their overall score. The disc will be considered out of play until the player makes a subsequent throw.

In general, a DROT does not measure as holing out, and the player must re-throw from the spot of the basket to continue playing.

You do not get the point in this case
You do not get the point in this case.

The Reasons For This Situation

This is because landing on top of your basket does not meet the criteria for “holing out,” as defined by the Professional Disc Golf Association’s rules

The disc must supine rest with the chains or the inside of the cylinder of the dish and stay there until released. 

In the disc golf, the final destination is to complete each hole in as few throws as possible. The target for each hole is typically a basket suspended off the ground, and players must throw their discs into the basket to complete the hole. 

If a player’s disc lands on top of your basket without entering the basket’s chains or inner cylinder, the throw is not a successful completion of the hole.

The basket, often designed with a metal or plastic rim, sits on top of your chains. 

A disc that lands on top of your boundary could bounce off or be knocked off by another throw, making it less reliable to determine a successful throw.

A disc landing on top of your basket does not meet the criteria, and as a result, it is not considered a successful throw.

It is that it doesn't meet the criteria
It is that it doesn’t meet the criteria.

What to Do and Where to Place the Disc in This Scenario?

The player’s throw does not count, and they must take a stroke on the hole if the disc they threw lands on top of your basket. 

After that, the player should position their disc directly under where it is currently resting on the basket. They should then take another shot from that location to add another stroke.

It would help if you also used a disc marker to indicate the ground rather than placing the disc.

This prevents the player’s disc from getting in the way of other players or being moved or thrown by another player by accident. It also assures that another player cannot throw the disc.

Note that the player’s partner may still be able to shoot from the original place, even if they are playing a friendly game of doubles with the person who made the error.

Disc golfers need to take a stroke
Disc golfers need to take a stroke.

What If the Disc Lands in your Basket and Bounces off?

In disc golf, when one disc strikes the basket as well as rebounds without staying in the basket, the throw does not calculate as successful, though this is a frequent occurrence and can be disheartening when a throw gets close yet fails to remain in the basket.

The rule is in place to ensure that players demonstrate a certain level of accuracy and control to complete each hole and prevent lucky or unintended bounces from influencing the game’s outcome. 

Does the Disc Become Impaled on the Side of the Basket Count?

Yes, if the disc gets caught inside of the basket, it is “in,” and the hole is complete. 

According to the Professional Disc Golf Association (PDGA) rules, if the disc comes to rest assisted by the chains and cylinder’s interior of the basket, it is considered a successful completion of the hole. 

You can successfully complete the hole when the disc must not touch the surface or any object outside the basket.

Upon completion, you will get a score regarding the number of throws it took to get the disc into the basket.

You should follow the rules of unplayable lies if the disc becomes lodged in the side of the basket or any other object on the course and you cannot retrieve it safely without causing damage to the system or the disc.

This situation falls under the category of “unplayable lies,” You would take a penalty stroke and then play your next shot from the lie of your last throw.

It does count when the disc gets stuck in the side of basket
It does count when the disc gets stuck in the side of basket.

Tips to Avoid Disc Golf Disc from Landing on Top of your Basket

You can avoid landing a disc on top of your basket from happening again by using the following tips:

  • Practice:

One of the most common reasons for a disc landing on top of your basket is that the throw was too high. 

Practicing regularly can help you make more accurate throws that are less likely to go over the top of the basket.

  • Adjust your throwing technique:

Consider adjusting your throwing technique if you consistently throw too high. This could involve using less power, changing your grip, or altering your release angle.

  • Use a different disc:

Different discs can behave differently in flight, and some may be more prone to going over the top of the basket. 

Experiment with other discs to find one that works better for you.

You can even test them out in practice to determine what disc has the best trajectory for you. 

Finding the right disc that fits your needs and trajectory goals can significantly improve your overall performance and scores.

  • Pay attention to the wind:

Wind can affect the flight of your disc, and gusts of wind can cause your disc to go higher than intended. 

Pay attention to the wind direction and speed, and adjust your throw accordingly.

  • Take your time:

Rushing your throw can lead to mistakes and inaccuracies. Take time to set up your shot and aim correctly.

Taking a few moments to ensure a successful throw can ultimately save time and make the experience more enjoyable.

Remember, landing on top of your basket is not always avoidable, and even the most skilled players will have shots that do not go as planned. However, you can reduce this by practicing more.

Practice more to avoid this situation
Practice more to avoid this situation.

Final Thoughts

If this disc golf disc lands on the basket, it doesn’t count as completing the hole or holing out. 

You will need to throw again from the basket’s location with your next shot, and the previous attempt will not count toward your score. 

A disc laying on top of your basket does not meet the criteria for “holing out,” as defined by the Professional Disc Golf Association’s rules. 

If you experience this situation, you should take a stroke on the hole, position your disc directly under where it is currently resting, and take another shot from that location. 

A disc marker is essential to indicate the ground to prevent the disc from getting in the way of other players or being moved by accident. 

My advice is that “practice makes perfect.”

Thank you for reading!